musky rodFly fishing can be one of the most exciting ways to land a fish, especially when you’re seeking larger species, or fish known for putting up a good fight, such as tarpon or permit. Fighting fish aren’t only found on the salty flats, though, and freshwater anglers can find all the fight they can handle from inland species, such as musky. You’ll need to arm yourself with a fly outfit to handle the job, though, and today we’ll get you started in the right direction.

Considering the size of spinning and casting rods designed for musky, many may believe that a sturdier fly rod in the ten-weight range is the way to go. A ten-weight will wear you out quickly, though, and they tend to be less easy to use and hard to find. Their finicky nature means you’re likely to make more casts than normal.

Just because musky are strong fighters, though, it doesn’t mean you need all that rod. You can get by with a nine or even an eight-weight rod and still be just fine. In fact, many prefer the smaller size. Rods in the nine-foot range will usually do the job, especially from a boat. You may want to go longer if you’re using a float tube, though.

The real factor when deciding between a ten-weight and something smaller will be how easily you want to be able to cast larger flies. Casting a ten-weight for hours at a time can be tiring, but the larger size will make casting large flies much easier.

You can find reliable rods from legendary companies like Sage, Temple Fork Outfitters, and Orvis. Bass Pro Shops’ White River brand offers quality rods, and Cabela’s Lsi rods are reliable, as well. No matter your budget, you should be able to find a reasonably priced rod to help you tackle musky.

Depending on where you fish, musky can reach lengths of over 50-inches. No matter their size, though, they always put up a ferocious fight that makes finally landing them that much more rewarding. Use the tips outlined above as a great jumping off point Be sure to come back for a closer look at a few popular flies to catch musky!