Many people are surprised to hear how fishing can positively impact your heart’s health. For example, simply walking to your favorite fishing hole is great because it gets your heart rate up. Furthermore, fighting large, ferocious fish can provide quite a workout. Fishing generally keeps you moving around for a while, which is always good for your physical health.

Other than your heart, fishing can benefit your body’s overall health, too. For example, your manual dexterity will greatly improve due to the amount of time you’ll spend baiting, tying knots, and reeling, which works out muscles you may not normally use. Your lungs will appreciate the influx of fresh air, too. Finally, while too much unprotected exposure to the sun’s rays can be harmful for your skin, getting out into the sun raises your body’s Vitamin D levels.

Lastly, aside from benefiting your body, fishing can also boost your mental health. By getting out of the house, away from your TV and computer—“unplugging,” as some call it—you can allow your brain to recharge and boost its ability to focus. Furthermore, there’s no coincidence that outdoorsmen are generally friendly; studies have shown that people who spend a few hours in nature have lower pulse rates and lower blood pressure than those who spend the majority of their time in busy, hectic cities.

Fishing is a low-stress physical activity that keeps your body moving for hours at a time. Being in the outdoors can boost your brain, too, though, making the activity a great all-around activity. As I said, you don’t really need an excuse to fish, but the health benefits listed can help defend the sport’s positive impacts against any potential naysayers.