Where you’ll undoubtedly spend a lot of your initial costs is your rod and reel, which obviously need to be able to handle the task at hand. Throughout the years, though, I’ve spoken with several muskie anglers who save money by grabbing a few pre-packaged heavy combos, which may only cost between $25 and $45. Furthermore, these combos tend to last a season or two before thei drags wear out, and then you can simply throw them away and replace them. Also, you can strip the line that comes with the combos and replace it with PowerPro braid, which is a high-quality, but inexpensive super-line. For guides and pros, this tactic may not be practical, but those looking to save some money on their muskie tackle will be surprised at the negligible differences.

Line releases are an integral part of muskie angling, but instead of line releases that are specifically designed for it, which are expensive and easy to lose, many anglers use plastic shower curtain rings and rubber bands. The rubber bands flex and many have found that they even boost the action of their lures.

Finally, there are many tackle storage boxes that have been specially designed for muskie anglers, and many of them are actually practical. However, it’s been my experience that they’re not entirely necessary, especially given their higher price tag. Instead, a few dozen clear plastic Plano boxes, stored in a large plastic tote, will do the job just fine. Store them vertically and label them for easy, quick access to lures and tackle on the fly.

Fishing itself is a costly endeavor—both initially and over time—with muskie angling being right up there at the top of the list. There are ways you can cut corners, price-wise, though, and today’s tips will help you save a bit here and there, which your wallet and your spouse will appreciate.