Spring has finally arrived. The snow has melted and the temperatures are consistently warmer. If you’re like me, the itch of getting out on the water is getting harder and harder to resist.

Early spring is a delicate time of the season for bass fishing, and as hard as it may be, you may need to forego tying on some of those new lures you picked up over winter in favor of throwing something that will better appeal to bass this time of year.

Jiggin’s Not Just for the Irish

During early spring, bass move towards shallow waters to prepare for the spawn. At this time their main prey item is crawfish. This means crawfish-imitating lures will be your weapons of choice early in the season, and the number one choice here is definitely a jig. Jigs are designed to mimic crawfish perfectly and slowly rolling your jigs over structure is an excellent tactic that yields results this time of year. A ¼ oz jig in a black/blue or green pumpkin pattern is a great choice when you’re targeting foraging spring bass.

Work the Worm

Jigs are great crawfish imitators, but as we all know, bass can be pretty picky and sometimes won’t even cast a second glance at what we think is the perfect lure. If a jig isn’t producing fish, try switching to a small Carolina-rigged worm. Working the warm subtly on the bottom kicks up dirt and resembles emerging crawfish. Bonus Tip: For a little extra pop, try adding rattles to the worm to imitate the noises that a crawfish’s claws make.

Go For a Spin

Another effective spring lure that some may find surprising is a spinnerbait. Regarded for their speed and flash, spinnerbaits are actually very effective at enticing lethargic bass when you slow-roll them along the bottom. This technique allows your spinnerbait to bounce off structure and appeal to the hungrier fish. Here, I like a ¾ or even a 1 oz black spinnerbait equipped with noisy Colorado blades.

The key to catching bass this time of year is being mindful of their behavior during this transition phase and utilizing the best lures and techniques. While the bass are moving shallow and starting to feed, they’re still not very active and their feeding habits revolve around specific prey. Catering to such behavior by utilizing the lures outlined above is what will help you pull in fish, keep your own skills sharp and start the season off on the right foot. 

© Chris Van Lennep | Dreamstime.com – Bass Fishing Cloud Reflections Dam Landscape