Enzo Ferrari refused to put radios in his cars. As the story goes, the Italian high performance auto designer was a purist and believed a radio would distract from the driving experience.

After all, the low whirr of the engine, together with the increasing vibration and whine of the RPMs, in concert with the leather seats and the blur of the outside world should be sensory candy enough.

These are the purest of cars from a country that brought us Roman orgies, Chianti and a very stylish capitulation during the Second World War. It is no wonder at all that maybe the rarest and most elegant of sports cars comes from the boot.

Maybe that’s what made a Ferrari as a homebuilt project a little easier. Still, building a car from scratch in a garage is one type of feat, and actually replicating a piece of art is altogether another story.

Take the Ferrari 250 GTO, for instance. Would even the most refined and ambitious of garage craftsmen attempt to copy this car? The original carries a $38-million-dollar price tag, and only 39 were built.

It’s a magnificently rare vehicle.

But, we guess, Rob Tempero is a magnificently rare car builder. He makes his living replicating such cars, on sort of the same level that a furniture builder might replicate a rare couch. But, a couch? No comparison.  

A replica of a Ferrari, unlike a watch or a necklace, is on par with a replica of an exotic ship or an iconic aircraft. And for a fraction of the original price, you too can have one. Or, if you’re feeling lucky, you could try and make one yourself. But be prepared fro more than a couple trips to NAPA.

Photo credit: Youtube