Zion Park HikesSituated in southwest Utah, Zion National Park is the home of some very diverse hiking trails.  Whether you prefer easy, moderate, or strenuous hikes, you will find a backpacking adventure that will create a lifetime of memories to enjoy for years to come.  Here are some of the top trails to consider when visiting Zion National Park. 

Difficulty rating:  Easy

Canyon Overlook – One of the reasons that this hike is so popular today is because of the breathtaking panoramas that you will encounter.  It is only a mile roundtrip with a 100-foot change in elevation.  Each and every step will be worth it.

Kayenta Trail – Another one of the more popular hikes in Zion National Park, the trail is situated against the park’s west wall between Big Bend and the Emerald Pools.  Although this is not a difficult nor lengthy trail (0.89 miles long), it links many of Zion’s trails together.

Difficulty rating:  Moderate

Emerald Pool (Middle) – The trail (2 miles) starts at the same trailhead as the one used for the Lower Pool. The difference is that it climbs higher up the slope and provides you with vistas of the Zion waterway. The streams out of Behunin Canyon and Heaps Canyon merge to form the Middle Emerald Pool.

Emerald Pool (Upper) – Of the three Emerald Pool trails, the 3-mile long Upper Pool trail is the pinnacle of the Emerald Pool system in Zion National Park.  However, you will climb 250 feet in those 1.5 miles to the Upper Pool.  You’ll need to be able to handle some scrabbling and stream crossing on this one.

Difficulty rating:  Strenuous

Angels Landing – This 5-mile hike is not for those affected by Vertigo or for the squeamish.  The trail is not “Iron-Man” strenuous but it is hard, which is probably why so many visitors take on the challenge.  In 2.5 miles the elevation changes 1,488 feet.  A word of caution – do not hike Angels Landing during thunderstorms as lightning strikes are very common all along the trail.

Mineral Gulch – This 16-mile trail takes you through one of the most pristine areas in Zion National Park’s eastern edge.  It follows a narrow canyon with year-round flowing water, meanders past two waterfalls, and traverses across two natural arches. The reward is at the end where the trail ends at a massive wall decorated with ancient petro glyphs.  You can do this hike as a 1-day marathon or make an overnight backpack trip out of it.  One way or the other, you won’t be disappointed.