First, most hunters cut their teeth on a .22LR and for good reason; they are the easiest and cheapest rifles to shoot. There is simply no better platform to teach new shooters and hunters how to shoot than the .22LR. It has no recoil, is quieter than other rifles, and most models are lightweight.

No recoil means a new shooter will most likely not pick up any bad shooting habits, such as tired arms or flinching at the fear of feeling the recoil. By avoiding these two common afflictions, a solid foundation can be laid for the shooters and hunters of tomorrow.

The round itself is one of the smallest offerings in high-speed lead traveling through a rifled barrel, which means its super-sonic noise signature as it snaps its way into the atmosphere is way less than other larger bullets. Also, since the round does not require as much energy as larger rifle calibers, there is less powder in each cartridge, which means less traveling gasses to go boom. 

The .22LR is a small compact round, so it does not require a heavily machined hunk of metal to contain its energy, making most .22 rifles weigh significantly less than the average rifle. This is a bonus for young pupils, as it will allow them to feel more in command over the weapon and fatigue will be less of a factor, allowing an increase in the time spent handling the weapon.

Although everyone knows how cheap it is to buy .22LR ammunition, don’t take for granted its availability. When all other ammo has sold out at most stores, like we are seeing happen nationwide right now, you can almost always find a selection of .22LR.

Finally, one of the biggest features of the .22LR that is virtually overlooked by even seasoned hunters is the effective killing range. The next article in this series will cover this, but to give you a hint of what is to come, did you know that a .22LR can kill a human size animal out to 440 yards? Stay tuned. 

For more on .22LR click here.